Designer    Case Study 27 Mar 2018
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Neolith surfaces help ‘House in Roma’ celebrate the architectural grandeur of its namesake city

Approaching this project, architect Pierluigi De Gasperis was fascinated with the dual principles of continuity and contrast. He wanted to include both concepts into the interiors.

Initial inspiration came from the local abundance of travertine stone, which combines subtle grey-white tones and delicately undulating veining. The desire was to incorporate this style throughout the villa’s flooring. However, naturally hewn stone is notoriously hard to fabricate into a continuous grain, due to its unpredictable and spontaneous patterning.

Rather than changing tack, this encouraged De Gasperis to consider alternative materials in order to achieve fluidity.

Classical Continuity
“We wanted to ingrain this house with personality and history” said De Gasperis, “Travertine’s prolific use in architecture over the last 2,000 years and its timeless ability to evolve and adapt in line with a specific style or movement made it an attractive choice. Its visual appeal and association with grandeur made it highly desirable.”

De Gasperis continued: “However, the permeability of natural travertine makes it susceptible to staining, especially from acidic substances, even seemingly innocuous, everyday liquids such as orange juice. Neolith® Strata Argentum provided a welcome solution. Its faithful interpretation of travertine made it the perfect choice for this project. The robustness required to meet the wear and tear associated with the modern family house, whilst offering the beauty and authenticity of the real stone. Importantly, we were able to design around the Neolith slab to create the consistency in veining we required.”

Flawless Fabrication

Rome is globally renowned for its impressive sculptures and iconic stone monuments. Paying homage to the skilled artisans of the city, ‘House in Roma’ floor is a masterpiece in fabrication and the centrepiece of the project. It is a feature in its own right, a vista of travertine, stretching beyond the threshold of the house, emphasising continuity.

As a result of the clever and meticulous fitting, by top fabricators Stone Arredo, the villa’s flooring creates a mesmerising illusion of fluidity. Rapturously flowing from staircase to ground level, out of the threshold and onto the terrace into a panorama of Strata Argentum, it provides a seamless connection between inside and outside. The surface’s silvery striations pleasantly stretch out to ultimately envelop a pool that incorporates the subtle, sandy, sun-soaked shades of Neolith’s Arena.

A Question of Balance

De Gasperis’s simple, but visually arresting mosaic of Neolith’s Barro, Pietra di Luna and Pierta di Osso in one of the two bathrooms lends a distinctly modernist look. Its approximated symmetry offsets the space’s metallic fixtures.

The second bathroom features the rustic look and feel of wood against lavish and lustrous marble. Neolith’s La Boheme B01 (floor) and La Boheme B02 (vanity top) used in conjunction with Calacatta Gold (walls) establishes a minimalist décor. The clever use of material patterns and textures within these two rooms amplifies the space within, creating a captivating visual equilibrium which excites and entices.

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